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Antipaper - Advocating Freedom of Speech in Health & Medicine! - Part 3
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Survey of 1000 Direct Sellers: “Communicating” and “How to Present” Are Top 2 Concerns

August 16, 2010
by The Technology Doctor

Survey of 1000 Direct Sellers:
“Communicating” and “How to Present”
Are Top 2 Concerns

My business partner and one of the best sales trainers on the planet, Mark Januszewski, is making huge waves again. Come hear what his take is on two subjects, “Listening” and “How to Present,” in two free webcasts, Aug. 29 and 30.  From Mark:

Aloha
Recently I ran survey, 1000 people …
Results were pretty cool, a little surprising about what people want to learn…..
BOTTOM LINE: It was clear that communicating with prospects better and ‘how to’ present were run away winners

We’ll be doing 2 live webcasts – Listening and How to Present. You can get the details here, always free, no upsells, just information folks can instantly use: http://markjtrains.com.

believe
mark j

P.S. For leaders: we ran a second survey to folks making $5000 a month or more and we found it really interesting that the #1 thing leaders wanted was presentation construction, not just for biz ops but for trainings. The formula for constructing an effective presentation is covered in detail and works equally well for biz ops 1:1, biz ops meetings/webcasts, trainings.

If you’re not familiar with Mark, he was just interviewed on the “Home Based Business Live” Radio Show (his bio is also there).

  • Want to learn how to sponsor more people?
  • Everybody knows it is a lot of work getting prospects to even look.
  • We email, call, text links. Finally, we get to make a presentation.
  • And? They do not join. Ever wonder why excited prospects don’t join?
  • I sure do – it’s frustrating and baffling, but I learned how to make presentations that made it easy for prospects to join.
  • My conversation rate went off the chart and networking became fun and highly profitable.
  • Why? I found out what prospects really want to know and how to present in a way that they understand.

I’ve been working directly with Mark, “The World’s Laziest Networker,” for over a year now. I am constantly picking up great ideas from him. He’s not really lazy – he is just amazingly effective and efficient.

There are 2 things you can count on by attending these webcasts.

  1. You’ll get more people to presentations and convert 90% of them.
  2. He’s not selling anything.

Why is he doing this? As a favor to me to help my team, and I am extending this favor.

You can register for both webcasts here: http://markjtrains.com.
JC

LiveScience: “Why We Can’t Do 3 Things at Once”

April 18, 2010
by The Technology Doctor

TWO things at once?  Try 5, 10, or 20!  Regardless of what your MTL (multi-tasking limit) is, this is another BIG REMINDER that we have to use a calendar and write down (type) everything we need to do, especially those things with a deadline!  If you schedule something, the likelihood of doing it is much, much greater than if you don’t.  Block time out on your calendar and let the “magic of planning” happen for you.

Thanks to my good friend Steve, I’ve had my whole life on Google Calendar for years – at $0 to use it (yep, no cost), the price should be affordable enough for everyone to not have an excuse for not using it (yes, intentional double-negative violation there, but it was fun).  Red highlights are mine.
JC

http://www.livescience.com/health/brain-multitasking-limit-100415.html

Why We Can’t Do 3 Things at Once

By Rachael Rettner, LiveScience Staff Writer
posted: 15 April 2010 02:12 pm ET

For those who find it tough to juggle more than a couple things at once, don’t despair. The brain is set up to manage two tasks, but not more, a new study suggests.

That’s because, when faced with two tasks, a part of the brain known as the medial prefrontal cortex (MFC) divides so that half of the region focuses on one task and the other half on the other task. This division of labor allows a person to keep track of two tasks pretty readily, but if you throw in a third, things get a bit muddled.

“What really the results show is that we can readily divide tasking. We can cook, and at the same time talk on the phone, and switch back and forth between these two activities,” said study researcher Etienne Koechlin of the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France. “However, we cannot multitask with more than two tasks.”

The results will be published this week in the journal Science.

Multitasking in the brain

The MFC is thought to be part of the brain’s “motivational system.” Specifically, it helps monitor the value of rewards and drives a person’s behavior according to that value. In other words, it’s where rewards are represented in the brain.

Scientists knew that a region at the very front of the brain, called the anterior prefrontal cortex (APC), was involved in multitasking. But they weren’t sure how the MFC was involved. Are the rewards for the different tasks represented separately? Or summed together?

Koechlin and his colleagues had 32 subjects complete a letter-matching task while they had their brains scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The subjects saw uppercase letters on a screen and had to determine whether those letters were presented in the correct order to spell out a certain word. They were given money if they performed the task with no errors.

The researchers saw that, the higher the monetary reward, the more activity there was in the MFC.

But then they made the task more difficult. In addition to uppercase letters, the subjects were also presented with lowercase letters, and had to switch back and forth between matching the uppercase letters to spell out, say, T-A-B-L-E-T, and lowercase letters to spell out t-a-b-l-e-t.

During this dual task, the MFC divided up the labor. One hemisphere of the brain encoded the reward associated with the uppercase letter task, and so showed activity during that task, while the other region encoded the reward associated with the lowercase task, Koechlin said.

Essentially, the brain behaved “as if each frontal lobe was pursuing its own goal,” Koechlin said.

To make things even more complicated, the researchers introduced a third letter-matching task. Here, they saw the subject’s accuracy drop considerably. It was as though, once each hemisphere was occupied with managing one task, there was nowhere for the third task to go.

[The] subjects perform as if they systematically forget one of the three tasks,” Koechlin told LiveScience.

Decision-making

The results might also explain why humans seem to have a hard time making decisions between more than two things, Koechlin said.

Previous work has indicated that people like binary choices, or decisions between two things. They have difficulty when decisions involve more than two choices, Koechlin said. When faced with three or more choices, subjects don’t appear to evaluate them rationally; they simply start discarding choices until they get back to a binary choice.

This is perhaps because your brain can’t keep track of the rewards involved with more than two choices, Koechlin said.

Technologizer: “How Long Do You Give the Desktop?”

March 9, 2010
by The Technology Doctor

This story is the third piece in a trio – to get the impact, read the third story below (or go to the home page and then scroll down 2 stories):

  1. Online shopping is growing dramatically;
  2. Online advertising will surpass print advertising this year for the first time ever;
  3. Desktop computers will soon be surpassed by smartphones for computing, convenience, and online access.

No red highlights here – I think you should read this whole thing.  Visit the Technologizer site for many more great tech takes, including yesterday’s story on the “The Secret Origin of Windows” which describes how Microsoft’s product manager was told that shipping the new Windows software “was a path toward a ruined career.”
JC

http://technologizer.com/2010/03/04/how-long-do-you-give-the-desktop/

How Long Do You Give the Desktop?

By Harry McCracken  |  Posted at 10:38 am on Thursday, March 4, 2010

One of the big subjects of debate on the Interwebs this morning is a big, existential technological question: Are phones on the cusp of replacing PCs?

Don Dodge (presently of Google, formerly of Microsoft) thinks so:

The future of computing is that your cell phone will become your primary computer, communicator, camera, and entertainment device, all in one. The exciting new applications are running in the browser, with application code and data in the cloud, and the cell phone as a major platform.  I think in the near future there will be docking stations everywhere with a screen and a keyboard. You simply pull out your phone, plug it into the docking station, and instantly all your applications and data are available to you.

So does Google Europe sales chief John Herlihy, as quoted by a Silicon Republic story:

“In three years time, desktops will be irrelevant. In Japan, most research is done today on smart phones, not PCs,” Herlihy told a baffled audience, echoing comments by Google CEO Eric Schmidt at the recent GSM Association Mobile World Congress 2010 that everything the company will do going forward will be via a mobile lens, centring on the cloud, computing and connectivity.

BetaNews’s Joe Wilcox basically agrees with Herlihy:

Three years — most certainly five — is not an unrealistic time horizon at all. Even if it proves wrong, Google is acting like change will come rapidly. Last month, Google CEO Eric Schmidt asserted the company would put mobile first — yes, before the PC. There is no Windows monopoly on mobile handsets to stop Google, Apple or any other would-be mobile competitor from rapidly advancing. Cloud services, whether delivered by applications or browsers, promise anytime and anywhere access to anything.

On Twitter, meanwhile, folks like Microsoft PR head Frank Shaw, Gizmodo editor Brian Lam, and analysts Michael Gartenberg and Ian Fogg chimed in:

@fxshaw

I am sure that Don wrote this post on his android phone.

@blam

just going to say, for non geeks, the phone is more accessible than the computer.

@gartenberg

The phone *is* important but it will not become MY primary computer, communicator, camera, and entertainment device. Nor yours either.

@ianfogg42

If primary = most time spent, then I think the iPhone is already my primary computer.

A few thoughts about this enormous topic, in no particular order:

  • Phones already are PCs–they just happen to be really small ones that don’t run exactly the same operating systems as their bigger brethren.
  • The vast majority of interesting applications are already highly mobile, networked creations. When was the last time that a brand-new piece of PC (or Mac) software was a huge deal? True, not all interesting apps are available in great smartphone versions yet. But they will be.
  • Old devices usually give way to new ones over time. But they usually don’t utterly vanish. And predictions about timetables are almost always wrong–they’re often either far too quick or far too slow.
  • A device can be both pervasive and–in terms of innovation and mindshare–kind of irrelevant. The FM radio is already there. Thinking of desktop PCs (ie, non-notebooks) as FM radios isn’t crazy.
  • I don’t see the need for large screens and full-sized QWERTY going away, ever. But there’s no reason why they must be connected to a dedicated, full-blown computing device in every situation. Like Don Dodge, I’ve long thought that we’ll end up with screens and keyboards that can talk to our phones. (I don’t think it’ll be done via docking stations, though–it’ll all be wireless so our phones can stay in our pockets.)
  • We don’t need to look into the future to see an era in which many people find phones as valuable in their own way as traditional PCs–it’s here today, and really got underway with the introduction of the BlackBerry more than a decade ago.
  • If virtually all of your data and much of your applications end up living on the cloud, the idea of a death match between PCs and phones starts to sound silly. You’ll use both–as well as great big screens like TVs–and they’ll all be portals to your real computer, which is…the Internet.

CNN.com: “Leading Economist Recommends Social Network Marketing”

February 9, 2010
by The Technology Doctor

It’s a great time to be an entrepreneur!

http://www.cnn.com/video/?/video/bestoftv/2010/01/06/nr.be.your.own.boss.in.2010.cnn

“Leading Economist Recommends Social Network Marketing”
January 21, 2010

From the CNN site above:  “The economy may stink now, but this could be the perfect time to start your own business. Our Josh Levs went to an economics conventions and had the opportunity to get advice from economists. One expert told Josh if you do it right, on your own, you will be a leader of the future economy.”

At the MLM-thewholetruth.com site, which alerted me to the CNN video, author Adrian Armstrong quoted Charlotte Phelps, an economist from Temple University, telling CNN’s Josh Levs that “now is the perfect time to start your own business.”

She “told Josh if you do it right, on your own, you will be a leader of the future economy.  Her research, based on economic history, shows that the entrepreneurs are at the vanguard of socio-economic change. They are the leaders of the economy.”  Adrian quoted her as saying that “it’s the network of friends, and social interactions, that will point you to opportunities in a niche, where you can create an idea which will pay off.”

Ms. Phelps said “that once you get an idea, that you talk to your friends, and everyone you know about it, and don’t keep it to yourself,” and “if you harness the technology, and talk to people about it, you can feel really good at the beginning of 2010… that it’s time to pursue that dream, and it might be the best thing you’ve ever done for yourself.”

I couldn’t help but note the surprise of the CNN reporter at the entrepreneurial enthusiasm of Ms. Phelps.
JC

The Desert Sun (Palm Springs, CA): “Many wooed by direct selling during slow economy”

January 5, 2010
by The Technology Doctor

I don’t think there’s a ton of money in a Pampered Chef business, and how many people want to do home sales parties anyway, but the point is that people are willing to do a lot of different things to generate income now.

Don’t miss the quote at the end, “The median income for a direct seller is $2,400 annually.”  That sounds high enough to catch a lot of people’s attention, with the mindset that since most people are very part-time in their networking/home-based businesses, what would a full-time, focused achiever be able to do.  We already know the answer.

Bolding and red highlights are mine.

New career starts at home

On Dec. 13, 2009, the Palm Springs, CA, online newspaper, The Desert Sun, ran an article about a man who “needed to find supplemental income and a reason to get out of the house”:

Wooed by a device that could quarter an onion without breaking the peel, Barton bought a “piece of junk” off a television infomercial a few months back.

It was truth in advertising all right: The blades were so dull, they couldn’t cut through much of anything.

After hearing about the bad chopper, a friend suggested Barton try a similar tool sold through The Pampered Chef, a direct seller of kitchen gadgets since 1980.

“The difference between that and what I bought was night and day,” Barton said.

The 62-year-old Rancho Mirage man became a Pampered Chef consultant a little more than a month ago, with 10 parties under his belt already.

The article commented on the trend of people in a recession turning to home based businesses:

With conventional means of finding a job drying up, many American workers like Barton are turning toward direct selling to make some money in this recession.

“It’s turned into a good opportunity for me,” he said. “It’s paying my mortgage.”

Important stats from the Direct Selling Association were given, showing the continued growth of the MLM/network marketing profession:

The Direct Selling Association, celebrating its 100th anniversary next year, tracks employment and growth of the direct sales industry. While average employment growth rates slowed 0.5 percent during previous recession years, direct sales employment rates grew an average of 8.4 percent.

We definitely look at direct selling as an alternative to people when they’ve been laid off,” said Amy Robinson, vice president of communications and media relations.

The number of direct sellers nationally started increasing toward the end of 2008, Robinson said.

While 2009 figures won’t be available for a few months, she said the group is optimistic about the number of new consultants joining the industry — and the selling they will do as they get started.

Towards the end of the article, the author noted there’s significant income to be earned:

Most people who get involved with direct sales have a specific goal in mind — a way to pay for a family vacation or a new car, said Robinson of the Direct Selling Association. The median income for a direct seller is $2,400 annually.

But with flexible hours and little risk to get started, there’s potential to turn the opportunity into a full-time career, she said.

JC

DSA: Member Companies Donate More than $15.7 Million to TODAY Show Holiday Gift Drive

January 5, 2010
by The Technology Doctor

This is an article I posted at http://www.mlm-thewholetruth.com/network-marketing-news/dsa-member-companies-donate/.  This adds quite a bit of credibility to the direct selling profession.
JC

DSA Member Companies Donate More than $15.7 Million to TODAY Show Holiday Gift Drive

by johncini on January 4, 2010

On November 20, 2009, the Direct Selling Association announced on their website and via a press release:

The Direct Selling Association will help kick off the 16th Annual TODAY Show Holiday Gift Drive on Monday, Nov. 23, by presenting the direct selling industry’s donation live on the show in Rockefeller Plaza.

Twenty-five direct selling companies donated a total of more than $15.7 million dollars in products and cash to the Toy Drive. Of the 25 participating companies, at least nine will be featured in their own spots on the TODAY Show during the holiday season. In its six years of participation, DSA member companies have donated more than $52 million in products, services and cash to the Toy Drive.

“The Holiday Gift Drive is an amazing way to make a real difference in the lives of thousands,” said DSA’s Amy Robinson. “Every item our member companies donate will impact the life of someone. It’s just one more illustration of the many ways direct sellers contribute to the community.”

The 25 direct selling and MLM companies participating include:

4Life
Amway
Arbonne
Avon
Blessings Unlimited
Creative Memories
CUTCO
DeTech
Essential BodyWear
Jafra
L’Bel Paris
lia sophia
Mary Kay
Oxyfresh
PartyLite
RealKidz Clothing
Rodan & Fields
Shaklee
Stampin’ Up!
TARRAH Cosmetics
Team National
The Pampered Chef
Thirty One Gifts
USANA
Vantel Pearls

The DSA pointed out in the press release that “Approximately 90 percent of direct sellers operate their business part-time.”

Philosophy of Life

December 25, 2009
by The Technology Doctor

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

I put this email in the masterpiece category – it’s one of the best messages ever, because it’s so true.   I was unbelievably blessed in so many ways when Mark and I met less than six months ago, but it’s amazing how much our philosophies of life run parallel.  (Scary how well he knows me. :))  I’m regularly impressed by the flow of quality people we meet on this planet.  I’m so grateful our paths crossed.

Fate looks certain, but then nothing’s guaranteed.” – Asia
Experience is not what happens to a man; it is what a man does with what happens to him.” – Aldus Huxley
Do not let what you CANNOT do interfere with what you CAN do.” – John Wooden
Unless you try to do something beyond what you have already mastered, you will never grow.” – Ralph Waldow Emerson
Accept the challenges, so that you may feel the exhilaration of victory.” – General George S. Patton
We must all suffer from one of two pains: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret. The difference is discipline weighs ounces while regret weighs tons.” – Jim Rohn
If you wanna live life on your own terms, you gotta be willing to crash and burn.” – Mötley Crüe.

I hope 2010 is your best year ever! I’m thankful for you.
JC

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: A little longer email, parphrased & plagariized from friends of mine, experiences and reading
Date: Fri, 25 Dec 2009 08:26:31 -0500
From: Mark J
To: John C

Seabrook NH [physical location], Kekaha, Kauai [mental location]

Howdy…!
Today, I want to say “Thanks” to all the wonderful people in my life.
And I hope you’’re having a great holiday.
Sure, the airports are clogged with sneezing, coughing mobs enraged by delays and the prospect of being locked in a house with relatives they can’t stand for a week.  And yes, the politics of this country continue to crawl ever deeper down the rabbit hole leading to Crazy Land.  And everywhere you look, greed and fear and suspicion lurk.
And yet… the world spins on, and if you can just let your mind settle for a few moments, the raw gorgeous beauty of everything can still take your breath away.
There’’s a clever Chinese toast that carries both a curse and a blessing:
‘“May you live in interesting times.”’
As all wordsmiths know, that word “interesting” embraces both the good and the bad, the yin and the yang, of life. Danger, excitement, and adventure.  The kind of events that will either kill you or make you stronger.  These interesting things become, for the most part, life-defining moments.  Is that overstating?  I think not.
Each moment, challenges, discouragement, victory, defeat, acceptance, rejection ~ an endless list really ~ happen to everyone. The difference is whether we define that moment or the moment defines us.  I learned a long time ago, and, I forget it regularly, that I define and determine the outcome, not the other way around.  In business, we never should let prospects or distributors determine the growth of our business.  We all do from time to time, of course but if we find it interesting instead of ‘defining’ everything changes.  In life, and let’s face it, our business performance is nothing more than a reflection of our life, the same principle applies.  A broken heart is celebrated by some as part of the experience of life ~ the privilege of actually feeling ~ and by others, who sadly let a relationship define them, that same broken heart is a crushing blow that inhibits one from seeing the unspeakable beauty that surrounds us every minute of everyday.   The critical difference, of course, is this: are we feeling observers while simultaneously participating in the elegant chaos or do we believe we are powerless drones who are overwhelmed by life’s calamities?
We’ve lived an interesting life.  Sometimes it’s too damn interesting and part of  me would welcome a long restful period, where not much happened……
As you can imagine living with me and my idea-a-minute mind gets a little too interesting for her and she thinks she’d like long latent periods too.  But we both know we’re ruined.  We  have a permanent jones now for the far end of the Feast table, where it’’s raucous, noisy, and unpredictable.  Are we junkies?  Hell no.  We love peace and calm, unplugging from everything ~ phones, email, relatives , etc., and especially the biggest cause of brain damage on the planet, the internet.   But, the adventure of life, the unmerited gift of being feeling observers while simultaneously participating in the elegant chaos, calls to us like the sirens in Homer’s Oddessy. You may recall, from your school days, Ulysses strapped himself and his crew to the masts so they would not be drawn to the sirens and crash upon the rocks, ending in certain death.  We are not strapped to the mast and feel very differently about it all.
How so?
Well, we believe certain death, of the spirit, is the sirens’ song if we are exclusively seeking calm and planning an adventure once a year [vacation?].  Yeah, I know its a little Zen-like here, but stay with me for a moment.  What if we looked at it all as a vacation ~ a delicious, unpredictable, honest-to-goodness fun house and used those weeks of vacation for the calm instead of adventure?   Ain’t it cool that you DON’T know what is going to happen and, in truth, it just doesn’t matter?  Playing it safe is the same thing as crashing onto the rocks, playing is safe and hoping for calm is the siren’s song.  The gift of life is about feeling alive and while I’d rather be succeeding than failing I clearly understand and believe that success and failure are both impostors, distractions to what my friend Doug calls ‘the real deal’ – feeling alive.   It is being able to participate, make choices…..not just choices about ‘what to do’ but the bigger choice of DECIDING to embrace the entire experience.  It’’s where the truly interesting people gather.
So bring it on, World.  Heap on the chaos, the uncertainty, the upheaval and especially the occasional jolt of sheer mind-bending astonishment.
Just allow me a moment, here and there, to appreciate the ride.
Take a look at John C.  New dad, first timer.  Fighting for more days with a toddler, not less days, while building a business with a new company and a pioneering concept.  And playing basketball.  And building a team page.  Some people have kids and stop.  Some people have kids and rock to new levels of achievement.  I am sure he feels overwhelmed at times……just wait till Sofie hits the terrible 2’s ~ LOL….but John is in.  I am not talking about the business here….he is not getting sucked in by the sirens coveting calm……he is experiencing and embracing being a single, a dad, a leader, a business owner and a leader……while talking a pretty good game of basketball.   He is embracing the adventure and not listening to the sirens’ song……surely a haunting melody promising calm, serenity and rest.  It’s death to the idea many hold as the reason for our existence.  To experience it all…..the entire kaleidoscope. Just like Artie, John is ALL-IN as they say in Texas Hold ‘Em.
We are facing health problems, business challenges, emotional challenges with some of the kids, time challenges, a blind Mom, a granddaughter with Leukemia……and moving to Kauai….seems, well, impossible……it is all awesome.  Is it all the way we would like it?  No.  But it’s all awesome.  Don’t think so?  Go talk to some folks like we did this week, all over 70, who miss, most of all, the action…..and regret…..not what they did……but what they did not do.
Professionals get paid……spectators pay to watch players play.  So who are we?  Who are you?
We’re not talking business here, we are talking professionals of life.  How do we get paid?  Experience and feelings.  The gift of feeling the entire spectrum of life is the pay.  Spectators pay with their life, giving up the ‘spirit’ to watch and not get hurt, stub a toe, have a heart broken…fail, get knocked down…..they miss it all.  The price is too high and, we don’t know it until it is too, too late.  Seriously, to talk to some 70-somethings…….so clear the ones who were ‘all-in’ all the time and have no regrets versus the one who are filled with regret.
To the folks still on the ride with me, have a great holiday:
Doug, John C, Sneaky Pete from Down the Street, Boggie, Bruce, Dori, Lisa, Carrie, RBI Machine Grant, Mike K, Giff ~ who actually sailed AROUND the world.… and……heck, you know who you are….
And to those already on the Next Big Ride… well, I’’ll always keep a chair empty for y’’all, cuz you’’re missed and still appreciated: Dad, Dick, Chips, George, Candy, Joanne, Dave, Cabby, Israel K, Linda, Aunt DiDi……
Breathe deep, let go of the bull-crap, and never stop appreciating the little joys of life, realizing it is all joy.
Live this day like it is your last……….
Dance like no one is looking
Sing like no one is listening
Love like you’ve never been hurt……

To all of us: Hug your friends and family like you mean it, like you will never see them again.
“You’’ve got to be digging it while it’s happening, cuz it just might be a one-shot deal.“  (Frank Zappa)
believe
mark j
Fate looks certain, but then nothing’s guaranteed.” – Asia
Experience is not what happens to a man; it is what a man does with what happens to him.” – Aldus Huxley
Do not let what you CANNOT do interfere with what you CAN do.” – John Wooden
Unless you try to do something beyond what you have already mastered, you will never grow.” – Ralph Waldow Emerson
Accept the challenges, so that you may feel the exhilaration of victory.” – General George S. Patton
We must all suffer from one of two pains: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret. The difference is discipline weighs ounces while regret weighs tons.” – Jim Rohn
If you wanna live life on your own terms, you gotta be willing to crash and burn.” – Mötley Crüe.
JC

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: A little longer email, parphrased & plagariized from friends of mine, experiences and reading
Date: Fri, 25 Dec 2009 08:26:31 -0500
From: Mark J
To: John C

Seabrook NH [physical location], Kekaha, Kauai [mental location]
Howdy…
Today, I want to say “Thanks” to all the wonderful people in my life.
And I hope you’re having a great holiday.
Sure, the airports are clogged with sneezing, coughing mobs enraged by delays and the prospect of being locked in a house with relatives they can’t stand for a week.  And yes, the politics of this country continue to crawl ever deeper down the rabbit hole leading to Crazy Land.  And everywhere you look, greed and fear and suspicion lurk.
And yet… the world spins on, and if you can just let your mind settle for a few moments, the raw gorgeous beauty of everything can still take your breath away.
There’s a clever Chinese toast that carries both a curse and a blessing:
“May you live in interesting times.”
As all wordsmiths know, that word “interesting” embraces both the good and the bad, the yin and the yang, of life.  Danger, excitement, and adventure.  The kind of events that will either kill you or make you stronger.  These interesting things become, for the most part, life-defining moments.  Is that overstating?  I think not.
Each moment, challenges, discouragement, victory, defeat, acceptance, rejection ~ an endless list really ~ happen to everyone. The difference is whether we define that moment or the moment defines us.  I learned a long time ago, and, I forget it regularly, that I define and determine the outcome, not the other way around.  In business, we never should let prospects or distributors determine the growth of our business.  We all do from time to time, of course but if we find it interesting instead of ‘defining’ everything changes.  In life, and let’s face it, our business performance is nothing more than a reflection of our life, the same principle applies.  A broken heart is celebrated by some as part of the experience of life ~ the privilege of actually feeling ~ and by others, who sadly let a relationship define them, that same broken heart is a crushing blow that inhibits one from seeing the unspeakable beauty that surrounds us every minute of everyday.   The critical difference, of course, is this: are we feeling observers while simultaneously participating in the elegant chaos or do we believe we are powerless drones who are overwhelmed by life’s calamities?
We’ve lived an interesting life.  Sometimes its too damn interesting and part of  me would welcome a long restful period, where not much happened……
As you can imagine living with me and my idea-a-minute mind gets a little too interesting for her and she thinks she’d like long latent periods too.  But we both know we’re ruined.  We  have a permanent jones now for the far end of the Feast table, where it’’s raucous, noisy, and unpredictable.  Are we junkies?  Hell no.  We love peace and calm, unplugging from everything ~ phones, email, relatives , etc., and especially the biggest cause of brain damage on the planet, the internet.   But, the adventure of life, the unmerited gift of being feeling observers while simultaneously participating in the elegant chaos, calls to us like the sirens in Homer’s Oddessy. You may recall, from your school days, Ulysses strapped himself and his crew to the masts so they would not be drawn to the sirens and crash upon the rocks, ending in certain death.  We are not strapped to the mast and feel very differently about it all.
How so?
Well, we believe certain death, of the spirit, is the siren’s song if we are exclusively seeking calm and planning an adventure once a year [vacation?].  Yeah, I know its a little Zen-like here, but stay with me for a moment.  What if we looked at it all as a vacation ~ a delicious, unpredictable, honest-to-goodness fun house and used those weeks of vacation for the calm instead of adventure?   Ain’t it cool that you DON’T know what is going to happen and, in truth, it just doesn’t matter?  Playing it safe is the same thing as crashing onto the rocks, playing is safe and hoping for calm is the siren’s song.  The gift of life is about feeling alive and while I’d rather be succeeding than failing I clearly understand and believe that success and failure are both impostors, distractions to what my friend Doug calls ‘the real deal’ – feeling alive.   It is being able to participate, make choices…..not just choices about ‘what to do’ but the bigger choice of DECIDING to embrace the entire experience.  It’’s where the truly interesting people gather.
So bring it on, World.  Heap on the chaos, the uncertainty, the upheaval and especially the occasional jolt of sheer mind-bending astonishment.
Just allow me a moment, here and there, to appreciate the ride.
Take a look at John C.  New dad, first timer.  Fighting for more days with a toddler, not less days, while building a business with a new company and a pioneering concept.  And playing basketball.  And building a team page.  Some people have kids and stop.  Some people have kids and rock to new levels of achievement.  I am sure he feels overwhelmed at times……just wait till Sofie hits the terrible 2’s ~ LOL….but John is in.  I am not talking about the business here….he is not getting sucked in by the sirens coveting calm……he is experiencing and embracing being a single, a dad, a leader, a business owner and a leader……while talking a pretty good game of basketball.   He is embracing the adventure and not listening to the sirens’ song……surely a haunting melody promising calm, serenity and rest.  It’s death to the idea many hold as the reason for our existence.  To experience it all…..the entire kaleidoscope. Just like Artie, John is ALL-IN as they say in Texas Hold ‘Em.
We are facing health problems, business challenges, emotional challenges with some of the kids, time challenges, a blind Mom, a granddaughter with Leukemia……and moving to Kauai….seems, well, impossible……it is all awesome.  Is it all the way we would like it?  No.  But it’s all awesome.  Don’t think so?  Go talk to some folks like we did this week, all over 70, who miss, most of all, the action…..and regret…..not what they did……but what they did not do.
Professionals get paid……spectators pay to watch players play.  So who are we?  Who are you?
We’re not talking business here, we are talking professionals of life.  How do we get paid?  Experience and feelings.  The gift of feeling the entire spectrum of life is the pay.  Spectators pay with their life, giving up the ‘spirit’ to watch and not get hurt, stub a toe, have a heart broken…fail, get knocked down…..they miss it all.  The price is too high and, we don’t know it until it is too, too late.  Seriously, to talk to some 70-somethings…….so clear the ones who were ‘all-in’ all the time and have no regrets versus the one who are filled with regret.
To the folks still on the ride with me, have a great holiday:
Doug, John C, Sneaky Pete from Down the Street, Boggie, Bruce, Dori, Lisa, Carrie, RBI Machine Grant, Mike K, Giff ~ who actually sailed AROUND the world.… and……heck, you know who you are….
And to those already on the Next Big Ride… well, I’’ll always keep a chair empty for y’’all, cuz you’’re missed and still appreciated: Dad, Dick, Chips, George, Candy, Joanne, Dave, Cabby, Israel K, Linda, Aunt DiDi……
Breathe deep, let go of the bull-crap, and never stop appreciating the little joys of life, realizing it is all joy.
Live this day like it is your last……….
Dance like no one is looking
Sing like no one is listening
Love like you’ve never been hurt……

To all of us: Hug your friends and family like you mean it, like you will never see them again.
“You’ve got to be digging it while it’s happening, cuz it just might be a one-shot deal.“  (Frank Zappa)

believe
mark j




American Unemployment: Charting The Nation’s Economic Demise, 2007-2009

December 20, 2009
by The Technology Doctor

Unemployment chart you must see to believe!

This should stun you. See the growing unemployment cancer metastasize with your own eyes, it’s here:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrP9qJmjIsA&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x5d1719&color2=0xcd311b&border=1]

The darker the color of a county, the higher its unemployment rate. For example, yellow is low unemployment at 2 to 3%, while purple is 7 to 10% and black is over 10%. Obviously, the higher the percentage unemployed, the more people who are out of work.

(I found this via The Daily Crux, http://www.thedailycrux.com/content/3439/Economy.)

(If the video doesn’t play or you want to see the original site for a much bigger view, go to http://cohort11.americanobserver.net/latoyaegwuekwe/multimediafinal.html. Make sure you click the PLAY button in the center of the map.)

Now that you’ve seen the darkening landscape, stop to consider that those “govt” unemployment numbers are probably under-reported (on purpose, IMO) by at least 50%. (See the video below for the truth.)

Notice how poorly the bubble states (especially California) are doing, and how well the area around Washington, D.C., is doing. The worst news is that we’re a long way from this situation getting better. Entrepreneurs and self-starters will make do, but those dependent on “secure” jobs will find the market to be unfriendly. Government is the only growth industry left anymore.

And for even more perspective on how honest and accurate your govt is, check out this video:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ulu3SCAmeBA&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1]

Most headlines quoted America’s unemployment rate in November at 10.0 percent, down from 10.2 percent in October. That number is depressingly large, but even that under-counts the true number of unemployed. For instance, it doesn’t count those people who don’t have a job and have given up looking for one, or those who have found marginal part-time work but still can’t make ends meet and are still looking for a full-time job.

The government keeps stats on all of these “marginally attached workers” and people “employed part time for economic reasons” (rather than by choice). If you add all of those people in, the total unemployment rate in the U.S. is 17.2 percent, compared to 12.6 percent a year ago. The only good news is that number is down from 17.5 percent in October.

Yours in truth,
JC

Theodore MacManus: “The Penalty of Leadership”

December 1, 2009
by The Technology Doctor

THE PENALTY OF LEADERSHIP
By Theodore F. MacManus
January 2, 1915

http://www.thememphislullaby.com/leadership.html

Elvis read “The Penalty of Leadership” and said that, even though the piece had been written before he was born, the author could have just as well been writing about him. Elvis said it described his life. He had a framed copy of it hanging in his private office upstairs and in his bedroom at Graceland.

http://retroscenemag.com/post/Cadillac-The-Penalty-Of-Leadership.aspx

It is interesting to remember in these troubled times for the US motor industry that they once strode across the world like mighty colossus, they set the tone and were the innovative ones that everyone copied.

Nowhere is this feeling of domination more obvious than in Cadillac’s “The Penalty of Leadership” advert that ran in 1915.  Interestingly given the tone and text of the ad, as presented below, it is in fact a reaction to an ad that Packard had used in order to attack the reliability of Cadillac’s new V8 Touring.

After its first run in 1915 the ad soon passed into folklore.  In 1967 Cadillac mailed scrolls to all Cadillac owners, including Elvis Presley, with the text on it.  It can still be seen hanging in Graceland.

Here is the text in all its glory:

The Penalty of Leadership

In every field of human endeavour, he that is first must perpetually live in the white light of publicity.  Whether the leadership be vested in a man or in a manufactured product, emulation and envy are ever at work.  In art, in literature, in music, in industry, the reward and the punishment are always the same. The reward is widespread recognition; the punishment, fierce denial and detraction.  When a man’s work becomes a standard for the whole world, it also becomes a target for the shafts of the envious few.  If his work be mediocre, he will be left severely alone – if he achieves a masterpiece, it will set a million tongues a-wagging.  Jealousy does not protrude its forked tongue at the artist who produces a commonplace painting.  Whatsoever you write, or paint, or play, or sing, or build, no one will strive to surpass or to slander you unless your work be stamped with the seal of genius.  Long, long after a great work or a good work has been done, those who are disappointed or envious, continue to cry out that it cannot be done.  Spiteful little voices in the domain of art were raised against our own Whistler as a mountback, long after the big would had acclaimed him its greatest artistic genius.  Multitudes flocked to Bayreuth to worship at the musical shrine of Wagner, while the little group of those whom he had dethroned and displaced argued angrily that he was no musician at all.  The little world continued to protest that Fulton could never build a steamboat, while the big world flocked to the river banks to see his boat steam by.  The leader is assailed because he is a leader, and the effort to equal him is merely added proof of that leadership.  Failing to equal or to excel, the follower seeks to depreciate and to destroy – but only confirms once more the superiority of that which he strives to supplant.  There is nothing new in this.  It is as old as the world and as old as human passions – envy, fear, greed, ambition, and the desire to surpass.  And it all avails nothing.  If the leader truly leads, he remains – the leader. Master-poet, master-painter, master-workman, each in his turn is assailed, and each holds his laurels through the ages.  That which is good or great makes itself known, no matter how loud the clamor of denial.  That which deserves to live – lives.

Your Business At Home: “Why Network Marketing? Donald’s Trump’s Response”

November 23, 2009
by The Technology Doctor

As stated in my previous post, we have a PDF of the actual magazine article below in our “Resource Library,” but it’s also easy to find online from many sites, including the link below. I’m not a big fan of the morals of The Ego (my imitation of “The Donald“), but you can’t criticize his work ethic, nor the interest and attention his name brings.
JC

http://www.professionalnetworkers.com/pdflibrary/WhyNetworkMarketing.pdf

Why Network Marketing? Donald’s Trump’s Response

Your Business At Home, March 2007, Volume 2 Issue 2

Marketing is a powerful tool, and network marketing can increase that power, provided you’re self-motivated. In a simple visual, see a product and remove the advertising agency from it. It’s up to you to do the marketing and advertising.

That’s a big job, but it can be done if you’re passionate enough to get going on your own, and to keep the momentum and motivation going at a high level. It requires an entrepreneurial spirit, and that means focus and perseverance. I don’t recommend network marketing to people who are not highly self-motivated.

Another important aspect of network marketing is that it’s inherently social, so if you’re not a social or outgoing person, I’d think twice about going into it. Sociability is a requirement.

Just like in advertising, there’s no point in having a fantastic advertising campaign if the product is unequally fantastic. Also, keep in mind that if you decide to become a distributor, you’ll be legally responsible for the claims you make about the product, the company and the available opportunities. But above all, make sure the product is worth your energy and total devotion. Otherwise, you could be energetically spinning your wheels.

Robert mentions the importance of going beyond your comfort zone when it comes to network marketing. He also mentions giving yourself enough time. These are good points to consider. I agree that leadership qualities are critical for success. You definitely have to have a take charge, can-do attitude.

As with any other undertaking, know everything you can about what you’re doing before you began. Network marketing has proven itself to be a viable and rewarding source of income, and the challenges could be just right for you. There have been some remarkable examples of success, and those successes have been earned through diligence, enthusiasm and the right product combined with timing. As with so many issues, there are tangibles and the intangibles involved, but success is not a total mystery, and that applies to network marketing, as well.

Most people have heard of focus groups, a research tool advertising agencies use. When they’re testing a new product they go to different locations and simply ask everyday people what they like and don’t like about new product. It’s best if you can keep the focus group idea close at hand when deciding about a product. Just because you like it doesn’t mean everyone else will. Finding a common denominator in product appeal will matter.

My advice about network marketing is to do your research, and put everything you’ve got into your product. Genuine enthusiasm is hard to beat, and the odds will be with you.